Saturday, July 16, 2011

Ring The Alarm playlist, BaseFM, July 16

Quantic soul orchestra - Raw ingredients - Nostalgia 77 remix
BT Express - Do it til you're satisfied
One essence - Blackness of darkness
Augustus Pablo - Lovers mood
Derrick Morgan - I'm the ruler
Earl Brown - Get together
Dandy Livingston and Rico - Rudy a message to you
Errol Scorcher  -Roach in de corner
General Trees - Everything so so so so
Mungos hifi - Super sharp shooter
Toddla T - Watch me dance - Andrew Weatherall remix
Ghostfunk - Dem back
Hypnotic brass ensemble - Spottie
Charles Bradley - No time for dreaming
Dave Brubeck - Take five
Bobby Valentin - Use it before you lose it
Antibalas - Che che cole makossa
Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Jordan - Stone cold dead in the market - Ticklah remix
Resonators - Mandrake 7" edit
Farm fresh sound system - Still lifted
Dub Kweli - Your gospel
Horace Andy - Cherry oh baby
Prince Jammy - Strictly dub
Big Youth - Chucky no lucky - Disciples dub
Havana boys - Paul's dub
Rae and Christian - Hold us down
Kraftwerk - Man machine

Friday, July 15, 2011

Vinyl is making a comeback #254 Waikato edition

There's a record fair on this saturday in Hamilton. Cue vinyl revival story from local paper..

Veteran vinyl going another round: Forget CDs and MP3s. There is a vinyl revival, and Waikato record buffs are as staunch as they come.

"... beware of labelling them record "collectors". They resent the term. Vinyl, it appears, is in a different league to stamps, coins, and model airplanes.

Graham Don said he would rather be called a "music nerd" or a "vinyl fanatic" than a record collector. He has been buying vinyl since he was 12 and nostalgically recounted his first purchase.

"I bought Iggy Pop's Lust for Life and Tom Petty's Damn the Torpedoes, and I was hooked on music ever since. Hooked on vinyl."

Hamilton Record Fair is on Saturday at Riverlea Theatre, 80 Riverlea Rd, from 2pm with entry $2. Early entry from 1pm costs $10.

“Manage the temptation to publish yourself”

Musician John Mayer did a clinic at Berklee music school recently, and essentially his take on the internet and social media was that it made him stupid, which is why he quit Twitter and blogging.

After hearing Amanda Palmer at Webstock earlier this year, it strikes me that Mayer's statements in this story are the complete opposite of everything Palmer says and does, the way she engages with her fans via Twitter etc. Mayer still seems stuck in a star system from 20 years ago. He wants to be the mysterious artist.

“The tweets are getting shorter, but the songs are still 4 minutes long. You’re coming up with 140-character zingers, and the song is still 4 minutes long…I realized about a year ago that I couldn’t have a complete thought anymore. And I was a tweetaholic. I had four million twitter followers, and I was always writing on it. And I stopped using twitter as an outlet and I started using twitter as the instrument to riff on, and it started to make my mind smaller and smaller and smaller. And I couldn’t write a song.”

But John Mayer’s main reason for discouraging promotion came from his own struggle to curb using social media, which should have been an outlet for promotion but eventually became an outlet for artistic expression. Mayer shared that he found himself asking himself questions like “Is this a good blog? Is this a good tweet? Which used to be is this a good song title? Is this a good bridge?”
Read: John Mayer at Berklee.

Russell Brown, get down

 
In the early 2000s I had a writing gig doing a music and technology column for Real Groove magazine for a few years. In the October 2000 edition, I did an interview with one Russell Brown. I just found it floating round my archives. When Russell started using the internet (in 1994), it cost $12 a megabyte.

The photo above is Russell featured in Stamp magazine, from the early 1990s - I found it cos the flipside of that page has a photo of me and my Picassos band mates (incl a butt-naked Johnnie Pain) snapped with our manager, Lisa van der Aarde. That's a photo for another day tho.


Russell Brown, get down.


Recently labelled as 'Hot' by Metro magazine for Hard News, his incisive weekly political commentary slot on Radio 95BFM.

Russell Brown started out as a newspaper journalist on the Mainland, before moving to the Big Smoke to take up the post of Assistant Editor at Rip It Up. He lived and worked in the UK for several years, before returning here with partner Fiona Rae in the early nineties, working first as Editor of Planet magazine, then moving into writing about computers and the internet for various publications such as the Listener, Computerworld and Unlimited. I emailed Russell a few questions to find out a few of his favourite surfing moves. Hang ten, Russell.

How long have you been surfing the net?


Since 1994. I bought a 14.4k modem from Iconz at the beginning of 1995 and was kind of own my own after that. It was pretty unfriendly - you logged onto a shell account on their Unix machine and you were expected to know an array of arcane Unix commands just to handle your email.

Why did you start using the net?
I had begun writing the Computer column for the Listener and so it was an obvious thing to do - but there was quite a bit of resistance to me writing about it as much as I did. Some people thought it was all hype and that consumer CD-Roms were what I should be devoting my attention to. I think I was right. One of the key reasons I was so keen to explore it was because I was a freelancer and I was conscious of not having access to the same resources as people who worked in big offices. The Internet seemed like the way to get those resources for myself.

What's the main changes you've seen since you first started using the net?


It's gone from a difficult command-line interface to a place to watch movies. My typical download speed now is about 1000 times what it was in 1994. Back then, traffic cost $12 a megabyte - at those prices my current usage would cost me $18,000 a month. Those changes have helped the shift from it being a fringe pursuit to being almost pervasive. We have very high rates of Internet usage in New Zealand. It's been interesting seeing it go from being dismissed by business to basically determining the future of business.

Has your use of the net changed over time?


It got very boring and functional for a while, because it's a tool of trade for me. I try now to remember to use it recreationally too - sites like ifilm.com. I spend less time in newsgroups than I used to, but I'm still ona good little mailing list where we argue about rugby. Our household uses it for information all the time.

What sites do you and your family visit regularly, for entertainment, information, and fun?


I news edit IDGNet NZ (www.idg.net.nz) so I'm there a lot. I read all the local news sites: the Herald, Scoop (which hosts my Hard News bulletin), NewsRoom and, lately, the horribly-named Stuff. Ifilm.com, The Guardian Website and Arts & Letters Daily less often. Macintouch, Macsurfer, and MacOS Rumors, Slashdot, Wired.

Fiona replies: I use television sites for looking up stuff about telly progs for work, such as Zap2it.com (horrible name, it used to be ultimatetv.com), epguides.com, rickontv.com, bbc.co.uk or the American network sites, like abc.com - anywhere I can find info I need about a show (often find good fan sites). Also look at my favourite, guardianunlimited (especially filmunlimited - fantastic). News, I look at Herald, INSIDE, Ain't It Cool News. The kids like FoxKids, cartoonnetwork.com, disney.com, lego.com, squirt.co.nz - basically, anything with good games! I browse occasionally at Flying Pig, and have bought books, but sometimes prices aren't that comparable. Also do most banking online - I can make transfers between accounts really easily, rather than farting around with bits of paper at the bank.

How much time on an average day do you spend on the net?


Overall, including publishing to our Website and doing email, 2-8 hours a day. If I've been in front of computer a lot during the week, I might avoid it at the weekends, or just do a quick email check. I'm not one of those people who can't be away from it for a day.

Is there fierce competition to get onto a computer in your house? Do you monitor where the kids visit? (Netnanny or similar software, or good old fashioned 'adult supervision')


I've wondered about some kind of netnanny thing for our more adventurous 6 year-old. It's faintly possible that he could accidentally click his way to something offensive from a games site or something, and he has a right to be protected from that for a while. But our computers are right by the living area, so it's not like they're tucked away. The kids like us to sit down with them anyway.

What's it like watching your kids grow up with computers as part of their natural environment (something that perhaps wasn't so prevalent in your own generation?)


Their whole relationship with media is quite different to ours. When I was a kid, you basically caught something when it was screened on TV and then it was gone. Our kids were born after the VCR and they fully expect to be able to copy and repeat anything they like. So already they're coming into the Internet with interesting expectations about control of media.

Could you live without the net/email, and what’s the longest you've gone without touching a computer (ie on holiday)?


I'd live, but life would suck without Internet access - apart from anything else I depend on the Internet for news more than any other medium these days. I've gone a couple of weeks without, when away on holiday - and come back to an absolute mountain of email.

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Ghost funk

From  the cat behind Jaydiohead,  Mos Dub and Dub Kweli... "Released in July 2011, Ghostfunk pairs one of my favorite hip-hop artists, Wu-Tang member Ghostface Killah, with vintage African funk, high-life, and psychedelic rock music."

Ghostfunk by Max Tannone

Imperica - The legacy of Len Lye

The relationship between art and advertising has forever been one of fascination. The manifestation of this relationship has been both plentiful and diverse. The Campbell's Soup can; television advertising from famous directors; and Beck's Futures are just three of a seemingly infinite number of ways that the relationship – and, sometimes, the tension – has been expressed to mass audiences.

Such a relationship clearly stretches across many decades, certainly as far as contemporary media is concerned. A pioneer of ways to bring art and advertising together is Len Lye, a New Zealand-born artist that lived for much of his life in the UK, where many of his more well-known works were commissioned and exhibited....

Kilodee electro

The debut single from Kilodee, my new project. Dirty strings, blippy drums, mariachi horns. Free DL too!

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

NYC 70s


NY PUNK from MARC CAMPBELL on Vimeo.

John Peel narrates this '95 documentary on the late 70's NYC Punk scene, made by Peter Frame of Rock Family Tree fame.

Monday, July 11, 2011

RIP Fonce Mizell

Seeing reports on Twitter that Fonce Mizell has passed away. Sad news.

ADDED Thurs 14 July: LA Times confirms report of his passing.




Mizell Brothers interviewed at Red Bull Music Academy, 2006 (transcript)