Saturday, August 28, 2010

Ring The Alarm playlist, BaseFM, Aug 28

Love Unlimited orchestra - King kong -Danny Krivit edit
Speedometer - Work it out - Beatfanatic remix
Shannon - Let the music play
Colman Borthers - She who dares - lounge mix
Seu Jorge and Almaz - The model
Augustus Pablo - Aquarius rock
Prince Jammy - Interboro dub
Brando - Conquering lion - Binghi riddim
Steven Stanley feat Skully - Dub version - Binghi riddim
Dark Angel - People come to
Jay Z at Studio One - Dirt off the shoulder
Jean Jacques Perrey and Luke Vibert - Ye olde beatbox
Sola rosa - Lady love - Bigga Bush version
Phillip Cohran and the artistic heritage ensemble - New frankiphone blues
Mulatu Astatke and the Heliocentrics - Cha cha
Pharoah roche - Sun of a beach - London mix
Fitz and the tantrums - Money grabber
Belleruche - 56% proof
Gil Scott Heron - Lady Day and John Coltrane
Johnny Hammond Smith - Fantasy
Reverso 68 - Piece together - Todd Terje mix
Shad - Yaa I get it
J Rawls - Lee Morgan story
Joi - Hurts sometimes
Piero Umiliani - Truck driver
Freddie Kruger - Something good

Skateboarders from hell!

Spotted this mad clip on legendary photographer Glen E Friedman's blog  - also go read his post on the mosque protesters in New York and how he and his friend Russell Simmons put up some controversial posters to counter them.... "This was warrented by all the insanity surrounding the proposed building of a new Muslim mosque about six blocks away from "Ground Zero" (never mind that there is already a mosque two blocks away from Ground Zero already, for 40 years)..."

Friday, August 27, 2010

Money grabber

Fitz and the Tantrums hail from Los Angeles, and serve up a healthy dose of Motown shimmer and soul swagger. Their debut album has just dropped, check this....



Get the album "Pickin' Up The Pieces" here: http://www.fitzandthetantrums.com/store
AND there's a free download of Moneygrabber on their site here. Check out some more info on the band (audio, videos) at Flavourwire.

Here's the band playing live...

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Happy birthday!

My blog turns seven today. Wow.

Open Souls get cheesy

The Open Souls drop a mad-ass 80s remix of their tune Dollars, off the latest album from this splendid kiwi combo, Standing In The Rain. Not a million miles away from the choice dance sequence in the film Boy....

Rock the casbah


Stumbled on this while looking for Todd Terje edits, as you do...  really nice edit of Rock the Casbah by The Clash, lotsa percussion and sax. Check it here

Bonus points - Mustapha dance (the original instrumental mix of Rock the Casbah)

Edit by Mr Krivit




Danny Krivit discussing the art of the edit. Can't wait to hear the new Strut comp from him - Edits By Mr. K Vol. 2 (out Sept 14) Track lists looks killer too.


Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Shad

Straight outta Canada, check this cat out... woah.



Free download of the above tune via RCD LBL here. And then there's the Oddisee remix too.
Shad Myspace. Check his official site too, nice blog styles. His album gets US release October 5, hopefully further afield too.

Check this 2nd video, hat tip to the Pharcyde...


Monday, August 23, 2010

Hey Jim. How do you spell New York?


I posted a clip from Jim Jarmusch's film Coffee and Cigarettes the other day - it features GZA, RZA and Bill Murray. Pitchfork have put up an interview with Jarmusch to coincide with him curating a day at All Tomorows Party NYC.

He talks about working with musicianas as actors in his films...

"... They were all very focused, and it was really a pleasure. I never had any trouble with any of them. Even Wu-Tang showed up on time. They were great. In fact, we were shooting Coffee and Cigarettes, and we were actually waiting for Bill Murray. He was only half an hour late. That was pretty amazing."


He also talks about his friendship with the late Rammellzee, and his upcoming projects  - such as a documentary on the Stooges... "There's no rush on it, but it's something that Iggy asked me to do. I'm co-writing an "opera." It won't be a traditional opera, but it'll be about the inventor Nikola Tesla, with the composer Phil Klein." He also has another film ready to shoot soon.

And my fave quote -  "There's a rule in my household that if Iggy is playing anywhere within 90 miles, we go". Great rule.


BONUS VIDEO: Pitchfork has footage of Jim Jarmusch, Bradford Cox, and No Age's Randy Randall playing Cortez the Killer.

Funky drummer!!!

Clyde “Funky Drummer” Stubblefield playing and being interviewed by Marley Marl (HT Diff Kitchen)  - DAMN! Funky ass shit.

Mark de Clive Lowe - live



MdCL and Sy Smith live in Washington DC last month. Kills it.
Hat tip to Potholes in my blog.

Protect ya neck, busker styles



Lewis Floyd Henry, London.

Sunday, August 22, 2010

The Making of OutKast's Aquemini


Track by track... read it here...


"By the time Aquemini was due to drop in the fall of 1998, no one knew what to expect from the-soon-to-be-iconic OutKast....

...Now that the Dirty South rules the world, it's easy to forget that Aquemini was the first Southern hip-hop album to earn the coveted five-mic rating from the former bible of the genre, The Source magazine.

At the time, R&B was dead, rap was on its last leg (R.I.P. Biggie and Pac), and Bill Clinton was in the Oval Office getting some head. But it mattered not. If post-soul polemics and pre-millennial angst had the world in a funk, Aquemini only made things funkier..."


snip... "Liberation" feat. Erykah Badu, Cee-Lo, Big Rube, Joi, Myrna "Skreechy Peach" Brown.

"... that [song featured] Erykah, Big Rube, Cee-Lo - again random occurrences. Dre's baby mama was Erykah Badu. I mean, damn, why wouldn't you put your baby mama on the record if she's Erykah Badu? It's not like he came to the studio and said, 'I want to put my girl on the song,' and this bitch work at the Varsity. She's Erykah Badu. Okay, do it."

The web is dead - long live the internet


Thats' the attention-grabbing headline from a Wired magazine story by Chris Anderson (author of The Long Tail) and Michael Wolff and it's delightfully provocative...

The Wired issue bases itself around that theme, and if you need an antidote to the waffle preached there, have a read of What's wrong with 'X is dead' from The Atlantic.

They observe that "The problem is Anderson's assumption about the way technology works. Serious technology scholars long ago discarded the idea that tech was just a series of increasingly awesomer things that successively displace each other. Australian historian Carroll Pursell, in reviewing Imperial College London professor David Edgerton's The Shock of the Old, summarized the academic thinking nicely:


An obsession with 'innovation' leads to a tidy timeline of progress, focusing on iconic machines, but an investigation of 'technology in use' reveals that some 'things' appear, disappear, and reappear...

And they close by noting that "Anderson's inevitable technological path [described in the article] happens to run perfectly through the domains (print/tablet) he controls at Wired, and away from the one that he doesn't." Funny that.

Best response I've seen tho was this one via Twitter from @ironicsans: “Just got my Web Is Dead issue of Wired. It came several days after I read all about it plus pro and con arguments and analyses. On the web."

80 blocks from Tiffanys



via Groovement: "Director Gary Weis’ 1979 documentary about the South Bronx and its gang culture, previously unavailable on DVD, will be released in the Autumn of 2010, the first time it has been offered to the public in decades, and will be accompanied by a handful of exciting bonus features.

Gary Weis was still working as a short film creator for Saturday Night Live when he came up with the idea for 80 Blocks after reading a Jon Bradshaw article, “Savage Skulls.” Published in a 1977 issue of Esquire Magazine, the piece centered on two gangs based in the South Bronx at the time — the Savage Nomads and the Savage Skulls. Weis became infatuated with the story and, soon after striking up a dialogue with Bradshaw, he convinced SNL producer Lorne Michaels to help him produce the film. Just two years later, in 1979, Weis and Bradshaw brought a camera crew to speak with members of both gangs, along with police officers, community activists, and civilians."

Indie record labels branch out

Photo: Uli Seit for The New York Times

This story in the New York Times talks about several indie labels taking on film distribution, both as small cinema runs and on DVD. The approach is similar to how the lables operate... "stay small and informal, know your audience, and put out stuff you like." Excerpt below...

"... This summer, Drag City, a Chicago label, distributed “Trash Humpers,” the fifth feature by Harmony Korine (the screenwriter of Larry Clark’s “Kids”). “We were very glad to take it on,” said Rian Murphy, Drag City’s sales director, “because it is something new and different, and we like that kind of thing, and because it doesn’t have to do with the record business right now, which is kind of in a bummer.” Drag City, which represents musicians like Joanna Newsom and Silver Jews, bought prints of the film and “made sure they were in constant motion” around the country.

“Trash Humpers” was “not held to the traditional channels for distributing a movie,” Mr. Murphy said, “because we don’t know what those are.”

He added: “If someone emails us, and they’re not a complete lunatic, or if they are a complete lunatic, and they have money and a screen....”

As a result, the film has played at a beer bar in Chattanooga, Tenn., a bookstore in Houston and the George Eastman House in Rochester, extending its life beyond the art house. (How many screens? Mr. Murphy didn’t know; the company barely even signs contracts with its artists. “It changes the atmosphere,” he said.) The “Trash Humpers” DVD is due in September.

RZA, GZA, Bill Murray

Love this movie. Coffee and Cigarettes, by Jim Jarmusch.