Friday, May 27, 2005



48 Hours
Went to the screening of Group Ten of the 48 Hour Film Competition last night - some of my music ended up in an animated short called 'Little Red Riding Hood and Dr Wolf: The Extreme Makeover Edition'. Looked great projected on the big screen at the Civic. The competition involves teams making a 5 min short film in 48 hours - they get given a genre, a prop (this years was a banana), a character (Bodil De Rezny, animal lover) and a line of dialogue ("Please don't do that").

Other notable entries included the group who got Disney Family Movie as their genre, and made a delightful film called 'Khristmas with the Khunts' about the Khunt family - yes, the H is not silent. They were getting kicked out of their home by property developers, so the father reassured the family it would be all right - "don't worry, Khunts stick together!" And sure, enough, they did.

Last years winner Radar is one of this years judges, watching 5 and half hours of shorts every night this week, poor bugger. He wrote about it in his column this AM in the Herald...

"...Many of the films are brilliant. Some are bad. A few are brilliantly atrocious, which makes them all the more enjoyable. It has, however, made me realise that election campaign advertisements and party political broadcasts should be produced in the same way. Each party should be given 48 hours to come up with a range of short films showcasing its policies. Each film must contain an explanation of economic policy using a real pie and contain a line of dialogue stating "and that's a promise". "

The Top 12 Shorts from AK screen at Civic Theatre, Sunday May 29th, Doors Open 8pm
Tickets Available from Ticketek from May 5th - Always very popular, book in advance

GRAND FINAL
The Live National TV Final on C4, SUNDAY JUNE 12, 9pm
The Top 5 films will screen, one from each city, plus a wildcard
Everyone can txt vote for their favourite film shown on C4
Overall Grand National Winner of the 2005 48HOURS will be revealed


Simon Grigg lists the bands he unreservedly hates. Well worth a read. First up, Dire Straits. "If the National Party were a band, they’d sound like this." He also gets stuck into Bob Dylan and Bob Marley, to name but a few.

As an aside, he also gets round to talking about the Fat Freddy's Drop album... "It’s not my cuppa…it’s pleasant enough, and its hit a nerve in NZ, but it still sounds to me like a feral (what is it with the feral thing in NZ right now…can musicians no longer afford soap) UB40 infused with a touch of Stevie Wonder, which is better tha
n The Black Seeds, who remind me of UB40 with Nick Kershaw on vocals. But I think its bloody fantastic that it’s number one, with all that implies for independent music and the future of musical expression in this country. You don’t have to like a record to support it.."

From Coolfer... "There's a lot of spin out there. A lot of laziness in chosing words. People could do better. Here are some translations.

Quote: "I think shareholders are the great evil of this modern world."
Translation: "I've been reading some literature given to me by Oxfam, and I'd like to think that record labels are inherantly different than other businesses and shouldn't care so much about the bottom line."
What should have been said: "Like many musicians, I cannot reconcile two immutable facts of the music business: That is is indeed a business, and that artists like myself would rather enjoy my celebrity status and my celebrity wife than act in a manner more befitting of my public statements -- such as starting my own record label or signing with an independent." [Like this big-name band, perhaps?]
• Inspiration: A direction quote from Coldplay's Chris Martin.

The rebound of internet radio, in the Village Voice

Via Boingboing "NPR's Rick Kleffel did a long interview with Chuck "Fight Club" Palahniuk which he ended up getting cut down prior to airing, due to Pahlaniuk's hilarious, R-rated side-remarks about his fans and their odd habits and confessions, as well as his fiction. The interview is up in an unexpurgated MP3 and definitely worth a listen." Over here. [note: it's a 39.6MB file]

And finally, Glorious Noise interviews the Music Supervisor for The OC...

GLONO: Oh yeah, I know. Hey, one final question.

Patsavas: Uh oh.

GLONO: Any chance you can kill off Marissa?

Patsavas: I love Marissa.

GLONO: She's got to die.

Patsavas: No way, I love Marissa. I do.

Wednesday, May 25, 2005

John Williams must die
And there's your four-word Star Wars review. Dialogue so wooden you could build several decent-sized suburbs outta it. Acting not much better. But it's all about spectacle, right? No witty one liners like back in the day with Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher. This puppy has dialogue flogged from sources as disparate as GW Bush and Frankenstein.


For your amusement...
Q. What is the quickest way to get a music critic in bed?

A. Send them the new White Stripes advance LP.

from Nerve.com: Sex Advice from Music Critics

but wait, there's more!
Sex Advice from Bloggers
Sex Advice from Publicists
Sex Advice from Stand-Up Comedians
tip of the hat to Brooklyn Vegan.

Coolfer follows the Bob Mould story linked yesterday. "Modern technology has again run up against good ol' business realities. At his blog, Bob Mould wrote about two websites that were posting his new album in its entirity and how he contacted them to request its removal. One, he wrote, had "respectfully removed the content."
Mould: "For the record: this project has taken me 3 years (on and off) to complete, with a price tag of around $50,000. ... There was no evil label paying these costs - I write the checks. I get paid on records sold. This is how I do my business. The price tag doesn't account for my own time and effort, for which I typically get paid fairly well. After 26 years on the job, I have earned my keep."

Also from Coolfer, Go team have signed to Columbia/EMI in the US.

"UK cartoony cheerleaders The Go! Team have inked a deal with major label powerhouse Columbia Records. After weeks of dinner dates with A&Rs from various labels at Warner, Atlantic and both of the Sonys, the buzz band closed with Columbia Records and EMI for publishing. Their sample-heavy tracks are supposedly giving EMI a major headache, especially considering none have been approved and the album has as of yet been released in the U.S.

And just when we thought hip hop was on it's way out, Epic Records has picked up Hasidic reggae rapper Matisyahu. The Hasidic rapper will be appearing at Bonnaroo with album release scheduled for early fall."

Monday, May 23, 2005



Outbreak of Orwellian logic attacks Writers Fest organisers
When is a presale ticket not a presale? When its a ticket to the Writers and Readers Festival.
Get this - I went to Ticketek on Friday to buy a ticket for an event at the Writers Festival on Saturday evening. They no longer had any presales, only door sales, plus a $2 service charge for venues outside the Edge (Aotea Centre, Town Hall etc) and of course, the event is not on their door!

It is accepted practice throughout the English-speaking world that a presale ticket means you buy it before the event, and a door sale ticket is bought at the door of the venue. Except if you are the organisers of the Writers and Readers Festival. Presales stopped when the Festival started on Thursday night, thus making you pay more for door sales, even if you are not buying the ticket from the door! What a briliant scam! Hope it makes the organisers Peter Wells and Stephanie Johnson incredibly rich.

Anyways, Dancing About Architecture was an interesting talk-fest. Graham Reid observed that the interview is the most interesting thing some musicians will ever do, listing Tommy Lee and Deedee Ramone as examples. Reid said that the space for music writing was diminishing, and record reviews of something that a musican had spent two years slaving over were getting 150 words in most magazines, 250 in the Herald. "I can clear my throat and that's 600 words alone", Reid said.

There was some discussion on the notion of a writer being generous in reviews, with Reid saying that wasn't up to a reviewer to offer constructive criticism. He said that musicians should go to their manager, their record label, for that - by the stage he gets the CD in his hands, it's a finished artifact. A reviewers job is to frame it in a current reference.

Nick Bollinger weighed in on this, talking about being generous vs the glib putdown. He gave an example, saying that the shortest review he ever wrote was of a David Crosby record, which he wouldn't tell us what the review said, but told us the album was called Oh Yes I Can.

Hats off to the audience member who managed to get the phrase 'socio-cultural theory' into his question.

33 days and counting
It's now 33 days since Joey Ratz was elected as Pope. One more day and he will have outlasted Pope John Paul I. Cross your fingers.


The Go! Team tunes on myspace.com, plus tour dates, even making it down to Australia in July - please, someone get em over the ditch to NZ!


Vice Magazine arrrives in NZ end of this month - hold on to your brain, this sheeet will fry it in 30 secs minimum. Published in US/CA/UK/Aus/Germany/Italy/Japan. Their Do's and Dont's lists are genius. Try this for size - The Corporatization of Drum Circles.

Bob Mould
is not happy, here's why... "This past weekend, I was alerted to two websites that are illegally distributing the entirety of my new album. (UPDATE: One site has respectfully removed the content.)"

Need a laugh? NZ Idol winner Ben Lummis has been dropped by his record label. Surprised? Thought not.
Bono and his incredible exploding ego.
Via Coolfer, a long interview with Bono, titled..

Bono: 'We need to talk'
"U2's frontman sits down with Greg Kot to 'clear the air' about negative reviews, the band's direction and the role of rock 'n' roll."


Heard some of a very interesting interview with longstanding local musician Rodger Fox on BFM's Jazz Show, hosted by that knowledgable young chap Sean Grattan.

Fox was talking about the current state of the music scene here, saying that he thought the various government initiatives like the Music Industry Commission and so on were on the wrong track, throwing money at 4 or 5 bands. He recalled the 70's and early 80's when he was in Quincy Conserve, describing that as a time when we had a proper music industry that supported a wealth of musicians, unlike now, in his opinion.

Back then, he said there was a brewery circuit that bands could go out and play and make a decent living. Fox said he was often playing 5 nights a week, and earning more than his father, who was a schoolteacher and head of the music dept at a high school. The brewery circuit developed from a time when the breweries owned a large number of pubs around the country and also handled the bookings for live entertainment - Fox said this eventually fell apart when the breweries decided to get out of owning property in the early 80s, and pub owners took over booking bands.

Fox suggested that if instead of throwing money at a smalll handful of bands, if the government schemes went towards creating a live circuit, then say 200 bands could be out there working and making a decent wage from being a musician, just like a nurse or a mechanic. Nowadays, if you are on a band, you can only play live in your own town once a month or so.